Washington and Lee University

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WebBridge -- Example

 

WebBridge is a commercial service designed primarily to take you from an article citation in one database to another database which can provide the complete text of the cited article.
  You will see this WebBridge icon displayed prominently in many database entries which do not include full text.   Click on it to retrieve the type of information described below.    REMEMBER -- You also may consult with a reference librarian about the availablilty of a particular article.

Click on this sample icon (above) to display the entry for an article entitled "How Many Students Does It Take..." in the New York Times, cited in the Academic Search Complete database:

  • A link to Annie ("Check W&L library hoildings...") may indicate that Leyburn Library and/or the Law Library has an active subscription to the periodical. Clicking on the link will lead you to information in Annie about our holdings -- years, volumes, physical format(s), location(s), etc.   In this case, Annie indicates that Leyburn has an active current subscription and older issues in microfilm format. 
  • "Find at" and "Available in" options indicate that you can retrieve the text of the article in particular databases available to W&L researchers;i In this case, Factiva and LexisNexis Academic will contain the article.   Important note: You will need to search for the article within these databases, perhaps by using words from the article title.
  • Some links to databases may be labeled "Law School only," which indicates that the database is available only to Law students and faculty. In this example: Lexis is limited to law school access.
  • There are links to "ILL" services (interlibrary loan) for both the undergraduate and law schools, but those probably are not needed in this case, because the article is available through the sources mentioned above.
  • Note: A link to Ulrich's Periodical will lead you only to information about the periodical in which are interested (the New York Times) , not to the full text of the article.
  • Sometimes there also will be a link to our Periodical Finder, which will indicate any additional databases which may contain full-text copies of articles from your periodical.

 

Find: