W&L Joins HathiTrust

W&L has become the newest member of HathiTrust, a global collaborative of research and academic libraries working towards its mission to ensure that the cultural record is preserved and accessible long into the future. Today, HathiTrust offers reading access to the fullest extent allowable by U.S. copyright law, computational access to the entire corpus for scholarly research, and other emerging services based on the combined collection. HathiTrust members steward this collection under the aims of scholarly, not corporate, interests. HathiTrust holds the largest set of digitized books managed by the academic, research, and library community.

Access W&L’s HathiTrust membership [For current W&L students, faculty, and staff. Login required]

What is HathiTrust?

Launched in 2008, HathiTrust has a growing membership currently comprising more than two hundred libraries.

Over the last twelve years, members have contributed more than 17.4 million volumes to the digital library, digitized from their library collections through a number of means including Google and Internet Archive digitization and in-house initiatives. More than 6.5 million of the contributed volumes are in the U.S. public domain and freely available online.

HathiTrust serves a dual role. First, as a trusted repository it guarantees the long-term preservation of the materials it holds, providing the expert curation and consistent access long associated with research libraries. Second, as a service for members and the public good, HathiTrust offers persistent access to the digital collections. This includes viewing, downloading, and searching public domain volumes, and searching access to copyrighted works. Specialized features are also available which facilitate access by persons with print disabilities, and allow users to gather subsets of the digital library into “collections” that can be searched and browsed.

What does Hathi mean?

HathiTrust was named for the Hindi word for elephant, hathi, symbolic of the qualities of memory, wisdom, and strength evoked by elephants, as well as the huge undertaking of congregating the digital collections of libraries in the United States and beyond. HathiTrust is funded by member libraries and governed by members of the libraries through its Board of Governors. More information on HathiTrust is available at: www.hathitrust.org.

LSO’s Favorite Books

Hispanic Heritage Month flyer

 

The Latinx Student Organization (LSO) has organized a variety of events, activities, and opportunities in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, which runs from September 15 – October 15.

Part of this larger slate of offerings, LSO partnered with the University Library to curate a book collection: “LSO’s Favorite Books.” Many highlighted books are written by Spanish speaking or Latinx authors.

Browse the below list to learn which items LSO selected as their favorite books, and which member selected what title. Some titles were ordered specifically for LSO and are on their way to the library!

Want a book that hasn’t arrived yet or is currently checked out?
To receive notification when the book is available, do the following:

  • When you are on that book’s library catalog record,
    select “Please sign in to check if there are any request options.”
  • Login.
  • On the resulting screen, select “Request.”

David Gálvez’s Favorite:

Diana Rodriguez’s Favorites:

Jerónimo Reyes’s Favorite:

Taylor Graham’s Favorite:

Jackie Tamez’s Favorites:

Oriana Gutierrez’s Favorite:

Isabel Lourie’s Favorite:

Carolina Rubio Regalado’s Favorite:

Thanks to Our Student Workers!

 

Pandemic or no pandemic, this is the time of year when we start to miss our graduating seniors.

But we in the Washington and Lee University Library feel especially appreciative of one particular group of soon-to-graduate seniors — the students who have worked as members of the library staff in Leyburn Library and/or Telford Library.  These students have contributed significantly to the library’s service to the W&L community by working regular weekly hours, while, of course, continuing to juggle all the other aspects of a demanding campus life.  So many of the services our faculty and students enjoy are dependent upon the contributions of our student workers.

To honor their work, each year we invite our graduating student workers to identify a book which is especially meaningful to them, whether because of an emotional attachment, the subject matter, or other reasons.  We commemorate each student’s selection by acquiring a printed copy of the book, placing a dedicatory book plate inside the front cover, and then displaying all the selections as a group on the Main Floor of Leyburn Library.   We are indebted to our Access Services Supervisor, Laura Hewett, for overseeing all the work involved in this process.

This Class of 2020 celebration has not been stopped by the physical closing of the W&L campus, but it has prevented most people from actually seeing the books on display.  For the moment, the photograph below will have to suffice.  However, the physical display itself will remain in place at least through the summer, so we have hope that (physical) library visitors soon may be able to share in our recognition of our students.

Below is a list of our graduating student workers (arranged by library department) and the books purchased in their honor.  You can see more information about the chosen books by browsing this collection in the library’s Primo database.

Thank you to all these hard-working students.  We hope you are healthy and safe and that we can see you again sometime soon!

 

Access Services

Ryann Carpenter, A Lucky Child

Angela Delos Reyes, Encyclopedia of Philippine Folk Beliefs and Customs, Volume 1

Elyse Ferris, Murder on the Orient Express

Cassandra Grebas, Medical Pharmacology at a Glance

Connor Higgins, Catch 22

Jenna Kim, Being Mortal

Jiwon Kim, Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine

Robert Layton, In the Gardens of the Moon

Chase Major, The Outsider

Laurel Myers, Yes, Please

Prakriti Panthi, How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking

Emily Roche, Bronte Transformations: The Cultural Disseminations of Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights

Aimee Rodriguez, The Way of the Househusband, Volume 1

Anna Soroka, Love Earth Now

Collection Services

Kenneth Hartzfeld, Baseball Americana: Treasures from the Library of Congress

Research Help

Emma Rabuse, Declaration des Droits de la Femme et de la Citoyenne

Digital Humanities

Win Gustin, The American Civil War in the Shaping of British Democracy

Alice Chambers, The Art of Forgery: The Minds, Motives and Methods of Master Forgers

Makayla Lorick, Teaching My Mother How to Give Birth

 

Thanks to Graduating Student Workers!

 

Some of the employees in Leyburn Library and Telford Library might look just a bit younger than the rest of us.   Those would be our student workers, who truly make it possible for the University Library to provide the resources and services which help define a Washington and Lee education.

Each spring we recognize the graduating seniors who have worked with us as student workers by purchasing a book of their choice, perhaps related to their major, their research, and/or their personal interest, and then placing a dedicatory bookplate in the front of the volume.  These books and their bookplates, along with a little information about each student, will be on display on the Main Floor of Leyburn Library through the week of Commencement.

We enthusiastically thank these young women and young men whose work and spirit have done so much to enhance the University Library.   We wish you the best of luck — and we will miss you!

 

Access Services

Allan Blenman – Supernatural & Philosophy: Metaphysics & Monsters …for Idjits

Austin Smith – On the Road

Brittany Smith – Milton and the Making of Paradise Lost

Soon Ho Kwon – The Courage to be Disliked

Courtney Jenkins- Lipscomb – Stealing From God

Alex Dolwick – Running Flow

Ford Gassaway – Frederick II:  A Medieval Emperor

Megan Doherty – Parkland: Birth of a Movement

Dianluca Carrilho-Malta – Crisis Cultures: The Rise of Finance in Mexico and Brazil

Yoko Koama – Kafka on the Shore

 

Access Services and Research Help

Hammad Ahmad – The Guernsey Literary & Potato Peel Pie Society

 

Research Help

Anukriti Shrestha – The Martian

Leila Lubin – So Much Reform, So Little Change

Katherine Cheng – A Walk Across America

 

Digital Humanities

Aiden Valente – The Spirit of the Liturgy

Jenny Bagger – American War Poetry

Patrick Rothfuss – The Name of the Wind

Katherine Dau – Vienna: Art and Architecture

 

Special Collections

Claude Miller – Skate the World

Another Book of the Week — Fraternity

 

One research topic of perpetual interest at Washington and Lee University is the Greek system — fraternities and sororities.

Best-selling author Alexandra Robbins recently contributed to the ever-growing collection of reliably controversial works on these groups with the publication of her book Fraternity: An Inside Look at a Year of College Boys Becoming Men (Dutton, 2019). The book just arrived in our collection and the call number is included in its description in our Primo database.

Author Robbins describes her investigations which resulted in the book in an article in The Atlantic.

 

 

Book of the Week!

 

OK, let’s try this.  Let’s look at a book just added to the Washington and Lee University Library collection — something interesting and/or cool.  Or just surprising.

This week’s nominee is Really Cross Stitch;  For When You Just Want to Stab Something a Lot.

Acquisition of this book was inspired by this term’s Politics 295B course taught by Robin LeBlanc and Ron Fuchs entitled “The Material Culture of Protest.”

You can view information on the book in our Primo database — and if you get to the shelf quickly, maybe you can check it out.

 

Honoring Our Senior Student Workers

 

Our student workers truly make it possible for the University Library to provide the services which help define a Washington and Lee education.  In the spring we recognize each of the graduating seniors who have worked with us as student workers by purchasing a book related to their major, their research, or their personal interest and then placing a dedicatory bookplate in the front of the volume.   (An example is at the bottom of this page.)

These books and their bookplates, along with a little information about each student, will be on display on the Main Floor of Leyburn Library through the week of Commencement.

We entusiastically thank these young women and men whose work and spirit have done so much to enhance the University Library.   We will miss you and we wish you the best of luck!

 

Mallory Stephenson (and one more)

Alice Tran (and one more)

Lauren McManus

Austin Choi

Hines Liles

Dani Leon-Osorio

Emily Stewart

Elizabeth Wolf

Monica Musgrave

Matthew Inglis

Christofer Chang

Truth Iyiewuare

Elizabeth McDonald

Rebecca Melkerson

Chandler Wickers

Arlette Hernandez

 

 

 

More Online Newspapers and Magazines

 

The Washington and Lee University Library recently enhanced its collection of online newspapers and magazines by acquiring several databases containing articles from millions of pages from publications from the first half of the early 20th century and earlier.   All of these new databases focus on publications from the United States and the United Kingdom.  Each of these resources is available to current W&L students, faculty, and staff from our Newspaper and Magazine Databases guide, as well as the A-Z Databases List and the Primo database.

19th Century U.S. Newspapers Digital Archive
About 500 U.S. newspapers from the 1800’s.

British Library Newspapers: Parts 1 – 5
Over 160 British regional and local British newspapers dating from the mid-18th century to 1950.

Financial Times Historical Archive
Complete contents from 1888 through 2010.

17th & 18th Century Nichols Collection of UK Newspapers
Digitized collection of U.K. newspapers dating from 1672 to 1737.

19th Century UK Periodicals
Magazines and journals published in Great Britain from 1800 to 1900.

Illustrated London News Historical Archive
Contents of this pictorial weekly newspaper of the same name from 1842 to 2003.

Punch Historical Archive
Complete 1842-1992 run of the British weekly humor/satire magazine.

Daily Mail Historical Archives
Full-text articles and images (1896-2004), plus Daily Mail Atlantic Edition (1923-1931).

 

 

 

Dictionaries Keeping Up with English

 

Any dictionary worth its salt (and where did that come from?) needs to keep growing.

The Washington and Lee University Library subscribes to the online sites of the two preeminent dictionaries of the English language and both of them recently revealed extensive additions to their empires of words.

Merriam-Webster Unabridged, the contemporary heir to Noah Webster’s American Dictionary of the English Language, is our most comprehensive guide to terminology in the modern English-language , at least, that of the American variety.   This database recently was enhanced by the addition of about 850 words and definitions, including glamping, dumpster fire, and mansplain.
This site also keeps tabs on the entries most often consulted in its collection; it should not be surprising that pi was heavily viewed around 3/14/18 and that Ides trended the next day.

The world’s preeminent etymological dictionary, the Oxford English Dictionary, is focused on documenting the history of English-language words, so their “new” words probably are not likely newly-born in 2017-18.   Still, the OED‘s research into where words came from and how they have changed in meaning and/or spelling continues, with their latest list of new/old words and definitions  including ransomware, footsie, and the intriguing diaper cake.

Certainly, both resources are worth their salt.

Kerner Commission Report

 

Fifty years ago this week one of the most famous “government documents” in modern times was published.

On 29 February 1968 the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, forever known as the Kerner Commission (for its chairman, Governor Otto Kerner of Illinois), released its report on the causes of racial and economic unrest in the United States, reaching the chilling conclusion that “Our Nation is moving toward two societies, one black, one white — separate and unequal.”    The report was initially released as a free Federal Government publication and actually was reprinted commercially as a paperback and became a national best-seller, eventually out-selling the Warren Commission report on the assassination of President John Kennedy.

The W&L University Library has a printed copy of the Commission’s original release (along with a volume of supporting studies), as well as the commercially-published version.    It also is available without-charge and in its entirety in Google Books.

In 2018 many news sources, such as National Public Radio, are noting the 50th anniversary of the report and calling attention to the release of a new study which seeks to update the Kerner Commission’s work for our times.  The library has ordered a printed copy of this new book, Healing Our Divided Society.

 

[from Report of the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders]